PipeChat Digest #5378 - Monday, May 30, 2005
 
Re: help... need a fanfare intro
  by "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com>
Re: help... need a fanfare intro
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: help... need a fanfare intro
  by "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com>
Re: 3 rank undulants
  by <tubamagna@aol.com>
Re: Practicing organ works at the piano
  by "jlinger@snet.net" <jlinger@aya.yale.edu>
Re: 3 ranks celestes, was Unpaired celestes
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Re: 3 ranks celestes, was Unpaired celestes
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Re: Organ choral prelude on "Gracious Spirit, Heed Our Pleading"
  by "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net>
Memorial Day IRC
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: blown rectifier fuse
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Andrew Henderson to Madison Avenue
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
RE: Dead Organ and Blown Rectifier Fuse
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
RE: Bi-Vocational Organists (for Glenda and those who are)
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Bi-Vocational Organists (for Glenda and those who are)
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
X-Post Off Topic
  by "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: help... need a fanfare intro From: "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> Date: Mon, 30 May 2005 04:09:56 -0700   Oh, forgot to mention... I'm coming from the key of F. Easy to get from F to D I suppose... just F, C, G, D. The question is how to make it sound cool, in one easy lesson ;)   On 5/29/05, Andy Lawrence <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> wrote: > I'm playing a wedding for a friend at 10th pres philly (anyone know > any cool details about the Allen there? Any fun facts for the > laypeople? Any favorite solo combos? Am I going to be terribly > disappointed? I haven't played any electronic of any quality in a > long time, but assume Allen probably put and still puts their best > efforts into this one.) >=20 > Anyhoo... the bride wants "Lauda Anima" (John Goss) for the > processional. I'm just playing it right out of the hymnal. The > question is... can anyone suggest a fanfare intro in terms this > uneducated musician can understand? (I'm better at fixin 'em than > playin 'em). I know... this is very basic improv. I don't have basic > improv skills. I just play the black dots usually. (I know I know... > gotta get some lessons... but not before saturday). :) I'm playing > in D. >=20 > Andy >  
(back) Subject: Re: help... need a fanfare intro From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Mon, 30 May 2005 06:11:52 -0500   You don't mention the date of this wedding or how good your chops are. :-) I've written a setting of Lauda anima that will be published by Paraclete Press in January 2006 (along with settings of Down Ampney and Crucifer). I didn't think about a fanfare at the outset, but the first 8 measures of = the piece might be registered and thought of that way. Four variations on the tune follow, and the piece is 81 measures long.   Overall, I suppose the piece is medium difficult. A couple of the = variations are actually undifficult, and I don't know how I allowed that to happen. = As needed, one could use all of the work or bleeding chunks from it to fit a wedding processional. If you're interested in seeing the piece, let me = know.   Robert Lind     ----- Original Message ----- From: Andy Lawrence <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, May 30, 2005 12:15 AM Subject: help... need a fanfare intro     > I'm playing a wedding for a friend at 10th pres philly >     > the bride wants "Lauda Anima" (John Goss) for the > processional. I'm just playing it right out of the hymnal. The > question is... can anyone suggest a fanfare intro in terms this > uneducated musician can understand?    
(back) Subject: Re: help... need a fanfare intro From: "Andy Lawrence" <lawrenceandy@gmail.com> Date: Mon, 30 May 2005 04:28:10 -0700   nah... I need the two S words... simple, and saturday (as in this coming saturday) :)   On 5/30/05, Robert Lind <lindr@core.com> wrote: > You don't mention the date of this wedding or how good your chops are. :-= )  
(back) Subject: Re: 3 rank undulants From: <tubamagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 30 May 2005 09:08:41 -0400     ----------MailBlocks_8C7332FD5BCC833_B80_48D82_MBLK-M41.sysops.aol.com Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"us-ascii"   When rebuilding the high-pressure Orchestral String Ensemble at Temple = Emanu-El in New York City, I made the decision to separate the various = undulants from their parent ranks; there was a Violes Celestes II and a = Viola Celeste II (at 4' pitch) among the stops. Because there was a = conflict between the publicity regarding the original organ, the paperwork = from the original builder, the names written on the stop actions = themselves, the stampings on the pipes, and the unfortunate series of = console rebuilds and replacements prior to our incorporation of portions = of the old instrument into the new, I do not know what the original = configuration truly was. There were also significant differences between = the drawings and the "as built" installation. Although we could only salvage 66 ranks of the original 108-rank = instrument to incorporate into the new 135-rank organ, the pipes of the = String Ensemble were not badly mutilated, and could be conjecturally = restored. If my feeble memory serves me correctly, there were three basic string = scales: the exceptionally narrow Violin scale, used for what we called the = First, Second, and Third Violins, as well as the 5-rank Cornet des Violes = (including the 3-1/5' tenth-sounding rank) the middle scale used for the = Violas, and the large scale, for what we referred to as the Grand Gamba, = Grand Gamba Celeste, and the Contra Gamba. All the undulants in the organ are 73 notes and tuned sharp, although the = THIRD Violin is tuned SLIGHTLY flat, with great additive effect. As a = rule, the more broad and gentle the tone, the more slowly we tune the = undulation. The more incisive and harmonically rich the timbre, the = quicker the beats. Sebastian M. Gluck New York City http://www.glucknewyork.com/   ----------MailBlocks_8C7332FD5BCC833_B80_48D82_MBLK-M41.sysops.aol.com Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"us-ascii"   <HTML><BODY><DIV style=3D'font-family: "Verdana"; font-size: 10pt;'><DIV> <DIV>When rebuilding the high-pressure Orchestral String Ensemble at = Temple Emanu-El in New York City, I made the decision to separate the = various undulants from their parent ranks; there was a Violes Celestes II = and a Viola Celeste II (at 4' pitch) among the stops. Because there was a = conflict between the publicity regarding the original organ, the paperwork = from the original builder, the names written on the stop actions = themselves, the stampings on the pipes, and the unfortunate series of = console rebuilds and replacements prior to our incorporation of portions = of the old instrument into the new, I do not know what the original = configuration truly was. There were also significant differences between = the drawings and the "as built" installation.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Although we could only salvage 66 ranks of the original 108-rank = instrument to incorporate into the new 135-rank organ, the pipes of the = String Ensemble were not badly mutilated, and could be conjecturally = restored.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>If my feeble memory serves me correctly, there were three basic = string scales: the exceptionally narrow Violin scale, used for what we = called the First, Second, and Third Violins, as well as the 5-rank Cornet = des Violes (including the 3-1/5' tenth-sounding rank)&nbsp;the middle = scale used for the Violas, and the large scale, for what we referred to as = the Grand Gamba, Grand Gamba Celeste, and the Contra Gamba.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>All the undulants in the organ are 73 notes and tuned sharp, although = the THIRD Violin is tuned SLIGHTLY flat, with great additive effect. As a = rule, the more broad and gentle the tone, the more slowly we tune the = undulation. The more incisive and harmonically rich the timbre, the = quicker the beats.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Sebastian M. Gluck</DIV> <DIV>New York City</DIV> <DIV><A = href=3D"http://www.glucknewyork.com/">http://www.glucknewyork.com/</A></DIV= ></DIV></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ----------MailBlocks_8C7332FD5BCC833_B80_48D82_MBLK-M41.sysops.aol.com--  
(back) Subject: Re: Practicing organ works at the piano From: "jlinger@snet.net" <jlinger@aya.yale.edu> Date: Mon, 30 May 2005 09:19:14 -0400   While solid piano technique is a great tool for the organ, I'm not sure I advocate piano practice, especially when working out fingerings in the = early stages of learning new music. What sounds best on piano does not always transfer to the organ. Having said that, I'm sure some of you can play 4-part counter part beautifully with nothing but your thumbs and with the occasional help of your nose!     Joe Linger http://linger.dyndns.org    
(back) Subject: Re: 3 ranks celestes, was Unpaired celestes From: "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net> Date: Mon, 30 May 2005 09:08:13 -0500   I finally thought to look in my stoplist file, and the Austin was designed by Lemare. The strings are:   Viola/Viola Celeste Echo Salicional/Vox Seraphique Voix Celeste   The Voix Celeste is a single rank, tuned sharp, and considerably louder than the other strings. An interesting item!   Paul   At 2:49 PM -0500 5/29/5, Randy Terry wrote: >Austin often employed three rank celestes in the echo divisions during = the >20's - flat, unison, and sharp tuned ranks. Perhaps the extra rank that = you >are speaking of was one of those. Alternatively, perhaps it was = originally >unison, but a later musician had it tuned as a celeste. > >Randy Terry > >>From: Paul Opel <popel@sover.net> > >>A slightly different topic- on a large 1920's Austin in and Episcopal >>church in Troy, NY, I recall there being 5 strings on the swell- as I >>remember, a Gamba and celeste, a viola and celeste, and another-just >>labeled "celeste"- meant to wiggle with everything else. Was Austin = unique >>in providing such a stop? > >_________________________________________________________________ >Express yourself instantly with MSN Messenger! Download today - it's = FREE! >http://messenger.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200471ave/direct/01/ > > >****************************************************************** >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> >List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> >List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>     http://www.sover.net/~popel/agomain.html      
(back) Subject: Re: 3 ranks celestes, was Unpaired celestes From: "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net> Date: Mon, 30 May 2005 09:17:43 -0500   Oh, yeah- a shortform stoplist is interesting.   Great: 16-888888-44-8 Swell: 16-888888888-44-2-III-16-88 Choir: 888888-4-2-88 Solo: 8888-4-888 Pedal: 32-1616(1616)-(8888)-16 (16-8-4)   Totally orchestral- great for a seamless crescendo. The 4's include an Octave on the Great, and a Violina on the swell; all the rest are flutes, as are both 2's, and the III is a dulciana cornet; not exactly heavy on upperwork!   Paul     I finally thought to look in my stoplist file, and the Austin was designed by Lemare. The strings are:   Viola/Viola Celeste Echo Salicional/Vox Seraphique Voix Celeste   The Voix Celeste is a single rank, tuned sharp, and considerably louder than the other strings. An interesting item!   Paul   At 2:49 PM -0500 5/29/5, Randy Terry wrote: >Austin often employed three rank celestes in the echo divisions during = the >20's - flat, unison, and sharp tuned ranks. Perhaps the extra rank that = you >are speaking of was one of those. Alternatively, perhaps it was = originally >unison, but a later musician had it tuned as a celeste. > >Randy Terry > >>From: Paul Opel <popel@sover.net> > >>A slightly different topic- on a large 1920's Austin in and Episcopal >>church in Troy, NY, I recall there being 5 strings on the swell- as I >>remember, a Gamba and celeste, a viola and celeste, and another-just >>labeled "celeste"- meant to wiggle with everything else. Was Austin = unique >>in providing such a stop? > >_________________________________________________________________ >Express yourself instantly with MSN Messenger! Download today - it's = FREE! >http://messenger.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200471ave/direct/01/ > > >****************************************************************** >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> >List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> >List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>     http://www.sover.net/~popel/agomain.html      
(back) Subject: Re: Organ choral prelude on "Gracious Spirit, Heed Our Pleading" From: "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net> Date: Mon, 30 May 2005 09:09:32 -0500   Karl Moyer wrote: > The ELCA hymnal supplement _With One Voice_ includes what I consider = an > exceedingly beautiful Pentecost hymn that arose out of Lutheran = missionary > endeavors in Tanzania and the resulting Tanzanian Lutheran church: = "Gracious > Spirit, Heed Our Pleading." The translation is by Howard Olson -- how's > THAT for a good-sounding Scandinavian name?? !! :-)   I always love world/ethnic selections done appropriately... I imagine an acapella sound similar to Ladysmith Black Mumbazo (sp?) or something. Unfortunately, the word accent in the English version comes off a bit clunky compared to what we can intuit from the original language.   We had a Tanzanian pastor preach this weekend at Our Savior's, Milwaukee! The Milwaukee Synod ELCA has quite a relationship with the Meru diocese in Tanzania - some folks here have even gotten a fabulous "Mt. Meru Coffee" project going, so anybody with a taste for Starbucks-level coffee can buy this and be assured the growers get a far, far above-average price, plus the profits are sent back into social services in the area! http://www.mtmerucoffee.org/   Sadly, I didn't get enough warning for an appropriate selection. The psalm cantor, though, (no choir Sunday) tried to be on the ball - just before I was sitting down to play the listed offering piece in the bulletin, he comes up to me with the page open to that very hymn!!! Nice thought, but a little late, hey?! Now I certainly have room for some spontaniety, but at least he/we could have planned it during the sermon <grin>... As a lowly interim at this point, I'm not surprised we aren't thinking on the same page yet, but that may change, stay tuned, the app deadline is May 31...   John Seboldt Interim Organist, Our Savior's Lutheran, Milwaukee, WI www.seboldt.net/annunciation www.seboldt.net/choralevensong  
(back) Subject: Memorial Day IRC From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Mon, 30 May 2005 10:31:08 -0500   Happy Memorial Day to all our members in the US.   Just a reminder that we will be having IRC tonight as we usually do on Monday nights beginning at 9 PM EASTERN time.   If you need information about how to connect please go to the IRC pages on the PipeChat web site at: http://www.pipechat.org/irc.html   David -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: blown rectifier fuse From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Mon, 30 May 2005 12:39:10 -0700   >Actually I think it's a bad idea unless you're planning on putting in >a fuse of some sort between the battery and the organ ... I wouldn't >want 750 cranking amps forced through a circuit that _was_ protected >by a tripped breaker or a blown fuse. > >It's a generally accepted good idea to keep the "magic smoke" _inside_ >the electronics. > >Whoever comes out to do the repair later might like the paycheck after >the job though.   i wonder what the actual cost of an Astron recitfier is.   We used a commercial power supply which is fused and has electronic shutdown incase of shorts or overloads.   13.8 volts @ 25 Amps about $100.   mcminone.com     John V --  
(back) Subject: Andrew Henderson to Madison Avenue From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 30 May 2005 13:37:40 -0400   Dear List Members and Friends;   The following announcement has been distributed by the Session of Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church, and I know it will be of interest to many members of Pipechat and PipOrg-L. Mr. Henderson will wear comfortably the big shoes of Dr. John Weaver, who has directed the music at MAPC for many years. For me personally, and for many, many others, this announcement has = a satisfaction quotient of slightly more than 100%!   The church website is at: http://www.mapc.com/   Malcolm Wechsler   Here's the announcement: <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<   The Session of Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church has appointed Andrew Elliot Henderson Director of Music and Organist, effective July 1, 2005. = Mr. Henderson will direct all music programs for the church, which will = include planning and playing all worship services, leading the adult and youth choirs, directing the St. Andrew Music Society Sunday concert series, and conducting the St. Andrew Chorale.   Andrew Henderson <http://www.mapc.com/art/Henderson.jpg> Andrew is a doctoral candidate at the Juilliard School and has been the Assistant Organist at the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, New York, from September of =   2001 through June 2005. A native of Thorold, Ontario, Canada, Andrew holds =   an MA degree in music from Cambridge University where he was Organ Scholar =   at Clare College, Cambridge, from 1996 to 1999. Through the Institute of Sacred Music he earned an MM in organ performance from Yale University, as =   well as a Certificate in Sacred Music. A Fellow of the Royal Canadian College of Organists, Mr. Henderson was a finalist in the 2002 Concours de =   Chartres and was the laureate of the Royal Canadian College of Organists' National Competition held in Ottawa in 2003. Andrew will continue as = Adjunct Assistant Professor of Organ at Westminster Choir College, where he = teaches graduate courses in organ literature, and as Organ Instructor at Teacher's =   College, Columbia University. His teachers have included John Tuttle, = Barrie Cabena, David Sanger, Thomas Murray and John Weaver.   Andrew is married to Mary Wannamaker Huff, a native of Greenville, South Carolina, who is also a gifted organist. Mary is currently Director of Children's Choirs at the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, New York, NY, and teaches music at the St. Ignatius Loyola Grammar School. She is also Director of Music at All Saints' Episcopal Church in Millington, New = Jersey. Andrew and Mary have a three-month old son, Elliot Wannamaker Henderson.   This appointment culminates a nine-month search process that began when = Dr. John Weaver announced his plans to retire at the end of May 2005. Members = of the search committee included, Co-Chairs Maggie Mills and Dick Iverson, = and members John Clark, Sr. and Carol Kechulius. Dr. Anderson served as staff = to the committee. Additional information will be forthcoming in an = introductory brochure to be released in June.   Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church 921 Madison Avenue (at 73rd Street) New York, NY 10021 212-288-8920      
(back) Subject: RE: Dead Organ and Blown Rectifier Fuse From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 30 May 2005 13:57:07 -0400   Dear Group and Gary in particular who started this thread, With all due respect I would caution you in the strongest way to avoid the posted suggestions of connecting car batteries, or any other generic rectifier to your organ's electric action system without first determining that the organ's electrical system down stream of the rectifier is not at fault and causing the short circuit. Though most older pre-solid state systems operate on 12 volts, some do operate at 24 volts. Some even use a combination of different voltages. Perhaps the best advise was given succinctly by Roy Redman and that is to simply bite the bullet and call your qualified and experienced organ man. The possibility of fire or further damage to the organ is quite real if the design rules of the electrical system are not recognized and obeyed. Sincerely Mike Gettelman    
(back) Subject: RE: Bi-Vocational Organists (for Glenda and those who are) From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 30 May 2005 10:19:56 -0500   This is in response to Karl=92s post. But by the way, thanks to those = who offered to read the book. It went into major revision last weekend =96 once those are incorporated in the typed version, I will follow up with you.   I think it is a hard life to be a musician on the scale of what Karl is describing. I know several degreed musicians in my area that teach (college, high school, middle school, whatever), carry a full-time O/CM job at the church, maybe play at a second church, become a band or choral director, teach privately, and then try to raise children, pay a mortgage and do musical stuff on the side. I love music, but at least I have something totally different to fall back on that pays the bills. I am not sure I would enjoy being a musician if I had to depend on making a living with it and had to take up multi-tasking on that scale.     There are times I think I'd like to go back to a regular church job, but then I begin to think better of that idea. Familiarity breeds contempt and discontent. Of course, if there was a nice 3-manual that would allow me to branch out and play some of the rep I've always wanted to do .. . . . But then there's the petty church politics, and the obligatory biddy/biddies and the priest/minister, and in the deep South the separate music director who is ALWAYS disorganized and procrastinates, and hands the organist crappy and hard stuff to do with no advance warning, and the turmoil and group angst of the choir and the congregation, and the egos that need constant stroking with no quid pro quo. No, I just talked myself out of that. Thanks. Time to go hope my back will allow me to mop the floors.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Karl Moyer   There is another combination which has less spice and sometimes more =93drag=94 to it: =A0the music teacher who is also a Church musician. = =A0This was my life, going from teaching music in a university situation by day to playing and teaching =97choir rehearsal is teaching! -- more of the same by night and on week-ends. =A0For such persons having a church position makes your life almost a seven-day-a-week music life with relatively little break from it all. =A0It was a little more convenient for me, since I taught in higher education and could control my daily schedule at least a LITTLE, usually at least enough to leave a two-hour block of time somewhere most days to go for a long run. =A0=A0But at = points it becomes a real drag, in part because time away from teaching is not the same sort of relief that one might have if he were a farmer or a house painter or a bus driver or the like. =A0 =20      
(back) Subject: Re: Bi-Vocational Organists (for Glenda and those who are) From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 30 May 2005 18:56:12 -0400   Dear Glenda and Group, With complete respect for Glenda's position I say Thank God for those=20 who feel the calling so strongly that material issues along with all the =   negative aspects of the job are sacrifices worth accepting in order to=20 perform sacred music for the glory of God and to assist the faithful in=20 their worship. I once thought at age 50 that my calling was to build pipe organs and=20 help perpetuate the tradition of the organ in the sacred environment. I=20 soon discovered after a bit of research that I would have to live in=20 very real poverty for quite some time while learning the trade and could =   expect only marginally better conditions even after gaining some=20 experience. Had I made this decision 30 years ago I might have had a=20 chance to live a lifetime of working at what I loved. But such a drastic =   change at age 50 was a dangerous choice, and like Glenda, I thought=20 better of it. I now happily attend recitals. read the organ lists, correspond with=20 organ friends, and treat it all generally as hobby. For me this is far=20 more practical and reasonable situation though the ache to be involved=20 in creating organ sound is still there pressing against my soul. Thank=20 God for those, organists and organ builders alike, who cannot stand the=20 pain of NOT being a musician or creating instruments. Cheers Mike Gettelman   Glenda wrote:   >This is in response to Karl=92s post. But by the way, thanks to those w= ho >offered to read the book. It went into major revision last weekend =96 >once those are incorporated in the typed version, I will follow up with >you. > >I think it is a hard life to be a musician on the scale of what Karl is >describing. I know several degreed musicians in my area that teach >(college, high school, middle school, whatever), carry a full-time O/CM >job at the church, maybe play at a second church, become a band or >choral director, teach privately, and then try to raise children, pay a >mortgage and do musical stuff on the side. I love music, but at least >I have something totally different to fall back on that pays the bills. >I am not sure I would enjoy being a musician if I had to depend on >making a living with it and had to take up multi-tasking on that scale. > > >There are times I think I'd like to go back to a regular church job, but=   >then I begin to think better of that idea. Familiarity breeds contempt >and discontent. Of course, if there was a nice 3-manual that would >allow me to branch out and play some of the rep I've always wanted to do=   >. . . . But then there's the petty church politics, and the obligatory >biddy/biddies and the priest/minister, and in the deep South the >separate music director who is ALWAYS disorganized and procrastinates, >and hands the organist crappy and hard stuff to do with no advance >warning, and the turmoil and group angst of the choir and the >congregation, and the egos that need constant stroking with no quid pro >quo. No, I just talked myself out of that. Thanks. Time to go hope my=   >back will allow me to mop the floors. > >Glenda Sutton >gksjd85@direcway.com > >-----Original Message----- >From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of >Karl Moyer > >There is another combination which has less spice and sometimes more >=93drag=94 to it: the music teacher who is also a Church musician. Thi= s >was my life, going from teaching music in a university situation by day >to playing and teaching =97choir rehearsal is teaching! -- more of the >same by night and on week-ends. For such persons having a church >position makes your life almost a seven-day-a-week music life with >relatively little break from it all. It was a little more convenient >for me, since I taught in higher education and could control my daily >schedule at least a LITTLE, usually at least enough to leave a two-hour >block of time somewhere most days to go for a long run. But at points >it becomes a real drag, in part because time away from teaching is not >the same sort of relief that one might have if he were a farmer or a >house painter or a bus driver or the like. =20 >=20 > > > > > =20 >    
(back) Subject: X-Post Off Topic From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 30 May 2005 18:54:21 -0400   Pardon in advance for a personal post.   I have been away from home and family in Colorado, and am in Brooklyn where my mom has been hospitalized for over 2 weeks on a respirator. Your prayers and support would be greatly appreciated.     David E   David Evangelides 719-231-4720 Cell / 719-867-2729 Office (Sent by wireless T-Mobile Sidekick)