PipeChat Digest #5380 - Tuesday, May 31, 2005
 
The diving organist
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Bach - A Wild Ride
  by "Stephen Williams" <stepwill@enter.net>
lawyer organists
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Lauda Anima
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
RE: Lauda Anima
  by "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@comcast.net>
unenclosed celestes
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
learning only one page...
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
bi-vocational organists
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
RE: Lauda Anima
  by "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com>
Re: Lauda Anima
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Fwd: bi-vocational organists
  by "Don McClure" <McClure@cc.admin.unt.edu>
Re: 5th manuals-Keates-Geissler
  by <Voicer40@aol.com>
Re: The diving organist
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@millersville.edu>
RE: Lauda Anima
  by "Steve Barker" <email@stevebarker.seriouslyinternet.com>
RE: Lauda Anima
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: Lauda Anima
  by "Steve Barker" <email@stevebarker.seriouslyinternet.com>
RE: unenclosed celestes
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Franck Organ Chorales and Registration
  by "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com>
Re: Lauda Anima
  by "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com>
RE: Lauda Anima
  by "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com>
Re: 5th manuals-Keates-Geissler
  by <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com>
Re: learning only one page...
  by "Beau Surratt" <surrattorg@gmail.com>
Re: learning only one page...
  by "Randy Terry" <randy_terry@hotmail.com>
Re: Lauda Anima
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
RE: lawyer organists
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
 

(back) Subject: The diving organist From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 07:02:03 -0500   Sounds like we need to all get together at an organ convention somewhere where there is a diving pool. Karl is a man of many talents. I make a great cheerleader, Karl =96 I for one would like to see the forward 1 = =BD and hear the Dupre. So get on those workouts.   =20   Glenda Sutton   gksjd85@direcway.com   =20   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Karl Moyer Sent: Monday, May 30, 2005 8:59 PM To: pipechat Subject: Re: Practicing organ works at the piano   =20   Reminds me of being stationed at Ft. Knox KY in the spring and summer of 1962. I had access to a piano in the chaplain=92s office and learned the Dupr=E9 pre & fue in g, Op. 7, and the Mendelssohn Sonata 3 there at the piano to the point of memory before every getting it to an organ that Fall. Free time that summer was divided between Bach and Dupr=E9 and working on my jack-knife and my forward 1 1/2 at the base pool. The results of the latter hurt more than of the former. I tell you, the water can HURT when you enter the wrong way. Wrong fugal entries don=92t hurt that much. :-) =20    
(back) Subject: Bach - A Wild Ride From: "Stephen Williams" <stepwill@enter.net> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 12:24:20 -0400   If you're not interested in Bach's music, or have just had enough, delete NOW. For those remaining, I want to share a little about what I'm doing a the moment. I've been asked to play the Bach organ works series again, making the 3rd go 'round, (but haven't agreed to it quite yet, since I now KNOW what kind of work is involved).   Anyhow, I'm in the middle of playing through, am up to program #4, and am practicing the chorale prelude Ach Gott vom Himmel sieh darein BWV 741 = (vol 3 p 4 in Barenreiter). I am absolutely blown away, in a good way, every = time I encounter this piece, not quite believing what is on the page. I'm aware of all the futuristic and creative harmonies in other works, particularly alarming in the Clavierubung, and maybe the Nun freut euch BWV 755, but = this piece is beyond anything else that I've encountered. In fact, it doesn't really begin to feel or sound like Bach until measure 30 when the chromaticism (very similar to the material found in Jesus Christus, unser Heiland, BWV 665, Leipzig Chorales) begins to unwind.   Has anyone else found this piece particularly striking, or have I been drinking a little too much . . tea . . again? BTW, this would be a great piece to play for your organ(ist) fans, and afterward ask who composed it.   Stephen Williams Allentown, PA      
(back) Subject: lawyer organists From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 11:38:12 -0500   In addition to Glenda, Jelani Eddington is a lawyer; I'd call that distinguished company, Glenda, at least for those of us who appreciate theatre organs!   Dennis Steckley   "Don't cry because it's over. Smile because it happened."--Dr. Seuss        
(back) Subject: Lauda Anima From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 12:10:25 -0500   Someone mentioned "Lauda Anima" to use for a wedding processional. I'm not familiar with this tune/hymn...........what was the source for it, again? I'd like to check it out.   Dennis Steckley   "Don't cry because it's over. Smile because it happened."--Dr. Seuss        
(back) Subject: RE: Lauda Anima From: "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 12:17:46 -0500   The tune is by John Goss (1800-1880) usually used for the hymn "Praise, my soul, the King of heaven". It's in just about every Anglican / Episcopal hymnal and probably even the UMC. Not sure about other denominations and most of my hymnals are somewhere in the crawl space.   Good tune, good hymn.   Michael     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois Sent: Tuesday, May 31, 2005 12:10 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Lauda Anima   Someone mentioned "Lauda Anima" to use for a wedding processional. I'm not familiar with this tune/hymn...........what was the source for it, again? I'd like to check it out.      
(back) Subject: unenclosed celestes From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 12:20:22 -0500     >Ok, now we've established they do exist elsewhere. What would necessitate >an unenclosed celeste?   Travis--   I think unenclosed celestes are particularly useful when dealing with stops that of such a delicate tone that it would be counter-productive to enclose them in a swell chamber. =20   Some organ-builders would insist, for instance, that a "true" Dulciana can only speak from an unenclosed position. Its celeste then, the Unda Maris, should also be unenclosed.   On such organs that have unenclosed string and celeste (and for the right type of piece), I like to basically end certain pieces on the Swell string and celeste, gradually closing the shutters towards the end. But if it works right, the last chord could be played on the enenclosed celeste, especially if the unenclosed celeste is quieter than the enclosed celeste with the shutters closed. (I'm thinking most specifically of Romantic pieces that have repeated chords at the end separated by rests.)   Daniel Hancock  
(back) Subject: learning only one page... From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 12:29:49 -0500   >One of the best teaching techniques I ever got was from a teacher I did not=20 >particularly like. She had me learn a page of the prelude and a page of >the=20 >fugue. Thus, within 4-6 weeks, I had the entire prelude and fugue learned=20 >and ready for polishing.   >I have used this technique ever since. When left to my own, I will often=20 >dribble through an entire Prelude or Fugue at a slow, boring tempo, but >when=20 >forced to concentrate on only one or two pages, then not only do I get the=20 >pages learned, the tempos come along much faster.   Randy--   I don't think I quite understand this technique...does this mean that you learn one page well and then apply quickly the articulation, fingerings, etc. quickly to the rest of the piece?   Or does it mean that you learn one page each week, and because you've pared down you're scope of work, you're able to do so more thoroughly?   Or did I miss the point completely?   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: bi-vocational organists From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 13:00:29 -0500   >I love music, but at least I have something totally different to fall back >on that pays the bills. I am not sure I would enjoy being a musician if I >had to depend on making a living with it and had to take up multi-tasking >on that scale.   As an organist AND an architect, I completely understand where you're coming from here (not that being an architect makes it any easier to pay the bills). =20   The "totally different something" is important for me, though. Although music and architecture (and indeed many other things, too) share common organizers in composition and interpretation, (rhythm, contrast, structure, stylistic influences, this could really go on...) the urge to do something different makes the change of pace nice, and it's also good to be able to do music because you WANT to, not because you HAVE to. =20   The drawback? Perhaps that one can't spend more time learning the music. Of course, Glenda's list of detractors to church jobs are deterrents any professional musician trying to learn new repertoire. I have two church jobs on top of a more-than-full-time architectural position. I simply find that I have to do well the things that I can control, and back off of the issues I can't.   Any other organist-architects out there?   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: RE: Lauda Anima From: "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 14:18:32 -0400   In the Hymnal 1982 it is number 410. There is a lovely arrangement for = four stanzas in the Organist's Edition of the Hymnal. The arrangement doesn't seem to be copyrighted. The descant on stanza four is copyrighted by = Novello.   If you watched the service of blessing for the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall, Lauda Anima was used. I did notice, though, that the British for some reason have expunged the Latin "Alleluia" for "Praise = him, praise him!" IMHO, "How pedestrian!"   I can send a NoteWorthy Composer or MIDI file of it (minus the descant), Dennis, if that will help.   Cole Votaw -- Springfield, Ohio, USA   Michael wrote: >The tune is by John Goss (1800-1880) usually used for the hymn "Praise, = my >soul, the King of heaven". It's in just about every Anglican / Episcopal >hymnal and probably even the UMC. Not sure about other denominations and >most of my hymnals are somewhere in the crawl space. and Denis wrote: >Someone mentioned "Lauda Anima" to use for a wedding processional. I'm >not familiar with this tune/hymn...........what was the source for it, >again? I'd like to check it out.     -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.322 / Virus Database: 267.3.2 - Release Date: 5/31/2005      
(back) Subject: Re: Lauda Anima From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 14:35:07 EDT   In a message dated 5/31/2005 1:19:31 P.M. Central Standard Time, rcolev@woh.rr.com writes:   the British for some reason have expunged the Latin "Alleluia" for "Praise = him, praise him!"     Perhaps it enables them to still make use of this hymn during the Lenten season by omitting the "Alleluia"s.  
(back) Subject: Fwd: bi-vocational organists From: "Don McClure" <McClure@cc.admin.unt.edu> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 13:40:22 -0500   <from Daniel Hancock>: <<As an organist AND an architect, I completely understand where you're coming from here (not that being an architect makes it any easier to pay the bills). =20   The "totally different something" is important for me, though. Although music and architecture (and indeed many other things, too) share common organizers in composition and interpretation, (rhythm, contrast, structure, stylistic influences, this could really go on...) the urge to do something different makes the change of pace nice, and it's also good to be able to do music because you WANT to, not because you HAVE to. >> </from> =20 Daniel (and listers), =20 I sympathize as well--this from an organist-engineer. Music and engineerin= g share the same types of influences mentioned, and the crossover of high-level philosophy is substantial. =20 My personal portfolio closely mimics Mr. Hancock's -- a university = engineering position (more than full time), a church job, and outside technical/academi= c pursuits combine for an environment where I must categorize! Those items = which I can do well receive that treatment; other issues are lower priority. =20 All my best to my fellow multi-vocational musicians. =20 =20 =20 Don W. McClure, PE University of North Texas, Denton =20 and =20 St. Andrews Church, Episcopal Farmers Branch, TX    
(back) Subject: Re: 5th manuals-Keates-Geissler From: <Voicer40@aol.com> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 15:27:03 -0400   I had the misfortune of tuning one of those monstrocities.   There was an article in the Mobile, Alabama paper about this salseman. He = " took" two Mobile churches, and his activities wer investigated by the = FBI, and he was extradited from Canada, charged with fraud, and sent to = the penitentary.   The large Casavant mentioned was removed from the Royal York Hotel in = Toronto, and sold to the First Baptist Church in Jackson, Mississippi with = suposedly 235 ranks. This "organ" has recently been replaced by Quimby = after about 15 years of ciphering. I saw them re-leathering some of the = 1920 Casavant Chests, which had the original leather. They re-leathred = just enough to make all the notes play. You can imagine what happed after = they got their money and skipped town.   The churches that got screwed with these five-manual trach heaps were:   First Baptist Church, Dallas, Texas (replaced) First Baptist Church, Jackson, Mississippi (replaced) Dauphin Way Baptist Church, Mobile, Alabama (being replaced) Cottage Hills Baptist Church, Mobile, Alabama (only four manuals) Shades Mountain Baptist Church, Birminghom, Alabama (which threw out a = beautiful 3- manual Aeoliam-Skinner that was not quite 30 years = old.)   I used to really feel sorry for churches which got screwed, but I think = that they really enjoy it. It seems that they poll their membership and = select for their music committee the people that know the least about = organs, and won't listen to anybody wno does.   Sadly, it's the innocent people of the congregation who end up paying for = theic committeee's ignorance. But to them, bigger is better. The = opportunity to have a big five-manual organ gets the best of them, so = people like Edgar Morrison thrive. You would think that when one church = ges screwed, others would take note and avoid such things as this. = Instead, others follow suit and get themselves burned. When you put your = hand on a hot stove and get burned, you usually have sense enough not to = put your hand on it again . However, that is apparently not enough for = these people.   D. Keith Morgan  
(back) Subject: Re: The diving organist From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@millersville.edu> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 15:51:05 -0400   What do you want: a =B3live=B2 display of the TV ad of the man who walks around the pool edge with a nice tan, loosens up to the delight of the young ladie= s present, gets on the board, and then completely =B3 wipes out?=B2 I wipe out with real skill these days. :-) It=B9s not pretty. You don=B9t wanna see this. :-) :-)=20   Actually, my left ear is cut open and a plastic tube inserted to solve = a medical problem, and I=B9ve not been on a board in at least 15 years!! But I wipe out in other ways, too, and they=B9re no prettier than what I last did off as one-metre board.   But a one-metre board can really be fun, and you can get a great work-out on a one-metre board, too!! At least it doesn=B9t hurt as bad as when you try a three-metre board and wipe out.   Karl     On 5/31/05 8:02 AM, "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> wrote:   > Sounds like we need to all get together at an organ convention somewhere = where > there is a diving pool.=A0 Karl is a man of many talents.=A0 I make a great > cheerleader, Karl =AD I for one would like to see the forward 1 =BD and hear = the > Dupre.=A0 So get on those workouts. >=20 > Glenda Sutton >=20 > gksjd85@direcway.com >=20 > =20 > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of K= arl > Moyer > Sent: Monday, May 30, 2005 8:59 PM > To: pipechat > Subject: Re: Practicing organ works at the piano > =20 > Reminds me of being stationed at Ft. Knox KY in the spring and summer of = 1962. > I had access to a piano in the chaplain=B9s office and learned the Dupr=E9 pr= e & > fue in g, Op. 7, and the Mendelssohn Sonata 3 there at the piano to the p= oint > of memory before every getting it to an organ that Fall. Free time that > summer was divided between Bach and Dupr=E9 and working on my jack-knife an= d my > forward 1 1/2 at the base pool. The results of the latter hurt more tha= n of > the former. I tell you, the water can HURT when you enter the wrong way= .. > Wrong fugal entries don=B9t hurt that much. :-) > =A0 >=20      
(back) Subject: RE: Lauda Anima From: "Steve Barker" <email@stevebarker.seriouslyinternet.com> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 20:53:58 +0100   According to the Historical companion to Hymns Ancient and Modern (1950) = the original words are 'Praise him, praise him' and were subsequently changed = to 'Alleluia, Alleluia' in many hymn books... There was also an extra verse between 3 and 4: Frail as summer's flower we flourish; Blows the wind and it is gone; But while mortals rise and perish, God endures unchanging on. Praise him! Praise him! Praise the high eternal one! Words by Henry Francis Lyte (1793-1847) First published in his 'Spirit of the Psalms', 1834. Steve Canterbury UK   ________________________________   From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of ProOrgo53@aol.com Sent: 31 May 2005 19:35 To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Lauda Anima     In a message dated 5/31/2005 1:19:31 P.M. Central Standard Time, rcolev@woh.rr.com writes:   the British for some reason have expunged the Latin "Alleluia" for "Praise him, praise him!"   Perhaps it enables them to still make use of this hymn during the Lenten season by omitting the "Alleluia"s.    
(back) Subject: RE: Lauda Anima From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 1 Jun 2005 08:13:53 +1200   >There was also an extra verse between 3 and 4: >Frail as summer's flower we flourish; Blows the wind and it is gone; But while mortals rise and perish, God endures unchanging on. Praise him! Praise him! Praise the high eternal one! "Is" that verse, not "was", i.e. we sing it here, still.   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: Lauda Anima From: "Steve Barker" <email@stevebarker.seriouslyinternet.com> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 21:16:16 +0100   I stand corrected! I've never seen or sung it from a UK hymnal.   Steve         >There was also an extra verse between 3 and 4: >Frail as summer's flower we flourish; Blows the wind and it is gone; But while mortals rise and perish, God endures unchanging on. Praise him! Praise him! Praise the high eternal one! "Is" that verse, not "was", i.e. we sing it here, still.   Ross     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: RE: unenclosed celestes From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 1 Jun 2005 08:20:16 +1200     >Some organ-builders would insist, for instance, that a "true" Dulciana can only speak from an unenclosed position. Its celeste then, the Unda Maris, should also be unenclosed.   Organs in the British tradition (and NZ is such) would say an Unda Maris = is a flat flute Celeste, while the Dulciana Celeste is labelled Vox Angelica and tuned sharp. I haven't heard an unenclosed Dulciana Celeste (whatever you might call it), but I can imagine it being very attractive to my ears, especially if the Dulciana is of the Snetzler tone tradition.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Franck Organ Chorales and Registration From: "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 17:14:34 -0400   Dear List Members,   Does anyone have suggestions concerning where to find registration and=20 expression directives for the Organ Chorales of C=E9sar Franck? I am most=20 interested in a low-cost solution. Right now I have an organ score derived= =20 from a MIDI file. I also put down the U$2.49 for a piano transcription. (I= =20 did this to gather info on triplets, key changes, etc.) I am not interested= =20 in playing or performing the Chorales (which are well beyond my meagre=20 talents), I'm just looking for the registration and expression indications= =20 so that I might work toward a pleasing virtual performance that doesn't=20 scream "ignorance" from the first note!   Thank you, in advance. Cole Votaw -- Springfield, Ohio, USA     -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.322 / Virus Database: 267.3.2 - Release Date: 5/31/2005      
(back) Subject: Re: Lauda Anima From: "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 17:18:39 -0400     >Perhaps it enables them to still make use of this hymn during the Lenten >season by omitting the "Alleluia"s.   Isn't that silly! Didn't W. Shakespeare something like, "A rose, by any other name, would smell as sweet"?   Cole Votaw -- Springfield, Ohio, USA     -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.322 / Virus Database: 267.3.2 - Release Date: 5/31/2005      
(back) Subject: RE: Lauda Anima From: "Cole" <rcolev@woh.rr.com> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 17:25:23 -0400   Somehow, the "Praise him" instead of our usual "Alleluia" just doesn't cut =   it for me. Reminds me of that Sunday School song, "Praise Him, Praise Him, =   All Ye Little Children." The vowels of "Alleluia" are so much nicer to intone. Oh well, I'm thinking "pastels" again--better watch it and go take =   my medication!   Cole Votaw -- Springfield, Ohio, USA   Steve wrote: >According to the Historical companion to Hymns Ancient and Modern (1950) = the >original words are 'Praise him, praise him' and were subsequently changed = to >'Alleluia, Alleluia' in many hymn books... There was also an extra verse >between 3 and 4:     -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.322 / Virus Database: 267.3.2 - Release Date: 5/31/2005      
(back) Subject: Re: 5th manuals-Keates-Geissler From: <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 17:30:44 EDT   In a message dated 5/31/2005 2:28:09 PM Central Standard Time, Voicer40@aol.com writes:   so people like Edgar Morrison thrive     The interesting thing for us was that after a thorough financial check, including obtaining a D & B report, Edgar turned up absolutely o.k. = However, later on it started to get smelly and stinky and sticky. Darryl  
(back) Subject: Re: learning only one page... From: "Beau Surratt" <surrattorg@gmail.com> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 16:56:40 -0500   HI! Not trying to speak for Randy, I believe that the point is in learning the notes 1 page at a time, with fingerings, etc., and then going back and applying articulation or learning 1 page of notes and articulations at a time rather than going through the entire piece quickly and having to unlearn mistakes.   Beau  
(back) Subject: Re: learning only one page... From: "Randy Terry" <randy_terry@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 15:19:16 -0700   Thanks - thought that would be obvious! LOL. No reason to learn any pages = if one doesn't finish the thing completely, right? <smiling>   Randy Terry   >From: Beau Surratt <surrattorg@gmail.com> >Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Subject: Re: learning only one page... >Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 16:56:40 -0500 > >HI! > Not trying to speak for Randy, I believe that the point is in >learning the notes 1 page at a time, with fingerings, etc., and then >going back and applying articulation or learning 1 page of notes and >articulations at a time rather than going through the entire piece >quickly and having to unlearn mistakes. > >Beau > >****************************************************************** >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> >List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> >List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >   _________________________________________________________________ Express yourself instantly with MSN Messenger! Download today - it's FREE! =   http://messenger.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200471ave/direct/01/    
(back) Subject: Re: Lauda Anima From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 18:17:42 -0400     On Tue, 31 May 2005 17:18:39 -0400 Cole <rcolev@woh.rr.com> writes: >Didn't W. Shakespeare something like, "A rose, by > any other name, would smell as sweet"?       Yes, he did:       "What's in a name? That which we call a rose By any other word would smell as sweet."   --From Romeo and Juliet (II, ii, 1-2)         Jim  
(back) Subject: RE: lawyer organists From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 17:46:09 -0500   He and I went about it the opposite way - he was an organist first; I was a lawyer first.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois   In addition to Glenda, Jelani Eddington is a lawyer; I'd call that distinguished company, Glenda, at least for those of us who appreciate theatre organs!